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Finding my Paradise

thedailywhat:

PSA of the Day: CollegeHumor has teamed up with the cast of Community, er, I mean the students of Greendale, to ask for your help in saving Community. I mean Greendale.

Think about it: Would you really want to go on living in a world without Greendale?

I mean Community

[collegehumor.]

(via thedailywhat)

Shea Bennett via AllTwitter

Cisco surveyed 2,800 college students and recently employed graduates and discovered that two thirds will actively enquire about a firm’s social media policies during a job interview, with some 56% refusing to work at a company that bans social media.

When you consider that a third of the students polled “consider the Internet to be as important as air, water, food, and shelter”, this isn’t all that surprising, especially as the internet for many young people nowadays is Facebook and Twitter.

Other key takeaways:

  • A third of the students polled prioritized social media freedom over salary
  • 4/5 students want to be able to choose the devices they use in their jobs
  • 68% of the employed graduates believe that corporate devices should be used for social media and personal use

(Source: stoweboyd)

gamesdesigned:

I illustrated this origami boat for a Zelda zine that Cory Schmitz is putting together.

You can make it yourself, just download and print out the two templates I made:

Page 1 (Link + sail + boat interior)

Page 2 (boat exterior)

Created by Alex Griendling

I am currently seeking pledges for another project, The 2012 Time Travel Calendar, via Kickstarter. It features 155 time travel events from Video games, movies, TV shows and Comics displayed on a single timeline that plays out over the year. Your help in funding it would be amazing.

(Source: gamesdesigned, via gamefreaksnz)

futurejournalismproject:

The United Nations gives a loose estimate that the world population will hit seven billion people sometime in the next few days.
It wasn’t so long ago that we hit six billion, and looking back 60 years global population was 2.5 billion.
At the Wall Street Journal, William McGun writes that added mouths to feed shouldn’t concern us. Instead, he suggests, we should look at the human potential among us:

At Columbia University’s Earth Institute, Prof. Jeffrey Sachs tells CNN “the consequences for humanity could be grim.” Earlier this year, a New York Times columnist declared “the earth is full,” suggesting that a growing population means “we are eating into our future.” And in West Virginia, the Charleston Gazette editorializes about a “human swarm” that is “overbreeding” in a way that “prosperous, well-educated families” from the developed world do not.
The smarter ones acknowledge that Malthus’s ominous warnings about a growing population outstripping the food supply were not borne out in his day. The track record for these scares in our own day is not much better. Perhaps the most famous was Paul Ehrlich’s 1968 “The Population Bomb,” which opened with these sunny sentences: “The battle to feed all humanity is over. In the 1970s, the world will undergo famines—hundreds of millions of people are going to starve to death in spite of any crash programs embarked upon now.”…
…The truth is that the main flaw in Malthus is precisely his premise. Malthusian fears about population follow from the Malthusian view that human beings are primarily mouths to be fed rather than minds to be unlocked. In this reasoning, when a pig is born in China, the national wealth is thought to go up, but when a Chinese baby is born the national wealth goes down.

Thoughts?

futurejournalismproject:

The United Nations gives a loose estimate that the world population will hit seven billion people sometime in the next few days.

It wasn’t so long ago that we hit six billion, and looking back 60 years global population was 2.5 billion.

At the Wall Street Journal, William McGun writes that added mouths to feed shouldn’t concern us. Instead, he suggests, we should look at the human potential among us:

At Columbia University’s Earth Institute, Prof. Jeffrey Sachs tells CNN “the consequences for humanity could be grim.” Earlier this year, a New York Times columnist declared “the earth is full,” suggesting that a growing population means “we are eating into our future.” And in West Virginia, the Charleston Gazette editorializes about a “human swarm” that is “overbreeding” in a way that “prosperous, well-educated families” from the developed world do not.

The smarter ones acknowledge that Malthus’s ominous warnings about a growing population outstripping the food supply were not borne out in his day. The track record for these scares in our own day is not much better. Perhaps the most famous was Paul Ehrlich’s 1968 “The Population Bomb,” which opened with these sunny sentences: “The battle to feed all humanity is over. In the 1970s, the world will undergo famines—hundreds of millions of people are going to starve to death in spite of any crash programs embarked upon now.”…

…The truth is that the main flaw in Malthus is precisely his premise. Malthusian fears about population follow from the Malthusian view that human beings are primarily mouths to be fed rather than minds to be unlocked. In this reasoning, when a pig is born in China, the national wealth is thought to go up, but when a Chinese baby is born the national wealth goes down.

Thoughts?

(Source: futurejournalismproject)

Zelda Fans,
join me in a group “Awww!”

(via gamefreaksnz)